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Innovation Observatory > Reports > Drugs > Durvalumab in combination with tremelimumab and chemotherapy for unresectable, locally advanced or metastatic urothelial cancer

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Durvalumab in combination with tremelimumab and chemotherapy for unresectable, locally advanced or metastatic urothelial cancer

Drugs

Cancer and Palliative Care

August 2020


Durvalumab in combination with tremelimumab is in clinical development for patients with unresectable, locally advanced or metastatic urothelial cancer (UC). UC, a subset of bladder cancer, occurs on the lining of the renal pelvis, ureter, bladder and urethra, and other parts of the urinary system and the most common symptom is blood in the urine. Metastatic UC occurs when the cancer has spread to other parts of the body, such as the liver or bones. Despite chemotherapy, most patients with metastatic bladder cancer experience disease progression and therefore additional treatment with immunotherapy may improve clinical outcomes.
Durvalumab and tremelimumab are immunotherapies, meaning they target the immune system. Durvalumab binds to a protein called PD-L1 to prevent it from binding its target (PD-1). In doing so, durvalumab allows immune cells, called T cells, to be activated so that they can destroy the cancer cells. Tremelimumab binds a protein called CTLA4 on T-cells, activating them and allowing them to kill cancer cells. Durvalumab and tremelimumab are administered intravenously. If licensed, durvalumab in combination with tremelimumab and chemotherapy will offer an additional treatment option for patients with unresectable, locally advanced or metastatic UC.

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