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This search function provides links to outputs produced by NIHR Innovation Observatory. These are briefing notes or reports on new or repurposed technologies. This search will not return all technologies currently in development as these outputs are produced as required for our stakeholders.

Innovation Observatory > Reports > Drugs > Fevipiprant maintenance therapy for uncontrolled asthma – add on therapy

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Fevipiprant maintenance therapy for uncontrolled asthma – add on therapy

Drugs

Cardiovascular Disease and Vascular Surgery

October 2019


Fevipiprant is in clinical development for the treatment of patients aged 12 years and older with uncontrolled asthma who remain symptomatic despite treatment with inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) with or without at least one additional controller. Whilst there is no cure for asthma, most patients are able to control their symptoms by taking daily preventative medication and additional controllers when required. However, a small subset of asthma patients are resistant to the current standard of care for asthma and are unable to control their symptoms. This can have severe implications on their quality of life as uncontrolled asthma can result in decreased physical fitness, decreased sleep quality and decreased productivity at work or school.
Fevipiprant is administered orally once daily. It works by preventing the binding of substances called prostaglandin to DP2 receptors on inflammatory cells therefore preventing the inflammatory response to triggers that result in an asthma attack. Fevipiprant is the first asthma drug to decrease the airway smooth muscle mass that is often excessive in the airways of patients with asthma. If licensed, fevipiprant will offer a new treatment option for patients with uncontrolled asthma.

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