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Innovation Observatory > Reports > Drugs > Pembrolizumab addition to chemotherapy, followed by maintenance with olaparib for BRCA non-mutated advanced epithelial ovarian cancer, primary peritoneal cancer, or fallopian tube cancer – First-line

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Pembrolizumab addition to chemotherapy, followed by maintenance with olaparib for BRCA non-mutated advanced epithelial ovarian cancer, primary peritoneal cancer, or fallopian tube cancer – First-line

Drugs

Cancer and Palliative Care

August 2020


Pembrolizumab in addition to chemotherapy, followed by maintenance with olaparib is in clinical development for the first line treatment of Breast Cancer Gene (BRCA) non-mutated advanced epithelial ovarian cancer, primary peritoneal cancer, or fallopian tube cancer. Ovarian cancer includes a group of tumours that arise from diverse types of tissue contained in the ovary and can often spread from the ovary to any surface within the abdominal cavity including the fallopian tubes and peritoneal cavity. While current treatments exist for these advanced cancers of the female reproductive system, significant unmet medical need remains for more effective treatment options with manageable safety profiles for patients in the first line setting.
Pembrolizumab delivered via intravenous infusion is a type of immunotherapy. It stimulates the body’s immune system to fight cancer cells by targeting specific proteins that stimulate an immune response. Olaparib is administered orally in tablet form and can lead to cancer cell death by blocking DNA repair by an enzyme (protein) called PARP. If licensed, pembrolizumab in addition to chemotherapy, followed by maintenance with olaparib will provide a new regimen for BRCA non-mutated advanced ovarian cancer.

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