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This search function provides links to outputs produced by NIHR Innovation Observatory. These are briefing notes or reports on new or repurposed technologies. This search will not return all technologies currently in development as these outputs are produced as required for our stakeholders.

Innovation Observatory > Reports > Drugs > Enfortumab vedotin for locally advanced or metastatic urothelial cancer

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Enfortumab vedotin for locally advanced or metastatic urothelial cancer

Drugs

Cancer and Palliative Care

July 2020


Enfortumab vedotin is currently in clinical development for the treatment of locally advanced or metastatic urothelial cancer in patients who have previously received chemotherapy and immunotherapy. Urothelial cancer, a subset of bladder cancer, occurs on the lining of the renal pelvis, ureter, bladder and urethra, and other parts of the urinary system. In advanced urothelial cancer, the cancer has grown into deeper layers including connective tissue or muscle. Metastatic urothelial cancer occurs when the cancer has spread to other parts of the body such as the liver or bones. There are currently limited treatment options for patients with advanced or metastatic urothelial cancer that have progressed after treatment with chemotherapy or immunotherapy.

Enfortumab vedotin is an antibody-drug conjugate that is administered intravenously. It works by selectively targeting the protein Nectin-4 which is found in high quantities in the cells of bladder cancer patients. When Enfortumab vedotin attaches to Nectin4 it causes the release of an anticancer agent, resulting in cancer cell death. Enfortumab vedotin has been demonstrated to be safe and efficacious in earlier clinical studies. If licensed, it may provide a treatment option for patients with advanced or metastatic urothelial cancer whose disease has progressed after being previously treated with chemotherapy and immunotherapy.

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