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This search function provides links to outputs produced by NIHR Innovation Observatory. These are briefing notes or reports on new or repurposed technologies. This search will not return all technologies currently in development as these outputs are produced as required for our stakeholders.

Innovation Observatory > Reports > Drugs > Xeomin for sialorrhea in children and adolescents aged 2 to 17 years

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Xeomin for sialorrhea in children and adolescents aged 2 to 17 years

Drugs

Neurology and Neurosurgery

July 2020


Xeomin is in clinical development for the treatment of chronic sialorrhea associated with neurological disorders and/or intellectual disability in children and adolescents aged 2 to 17 years. Sialorrhea is excess saliva accumulation, usually due to problems swallowing, leading to drooling. Sialorrhea can lead to complications including skin infections and breathing problems, but also embarrassment and social isolation.

Xeomin is one formulation of botulinum neurotoxin type A. It is injected into salivary glands and reduces saliva production. Currently, it is recommended as a specialist option for treating sialorrhea in children and adolescents, but is not yet licensed for this indication. It is an alternative to anticholinergic drugs which are also used to reduce saliva flow, but which can have side effects in a number of patients. If licensed, Xeomin will offer an additional treatment option for chronic sialorrhea in children and adolescents aged 2 to 17 years.

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