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Innovation Observatory > Reports > Drugs > Nivolumab in addition to temozolomide and radiotherapy for MGMT-methylated glioblastoma in newly diagnosed adults – first line

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Nivolumab in addition to temozolomide and radiotherapy for MGMT-methylated glioblastoma in newly diagnosed adults – first line

Drugs

Cancer and Palliative Care

January 2019


Nivolumab in addition to temozolomide and radiotherapy is being investigated as a treatment option for adult patients newly diagnosed with MGMT-methylated glioblastoma. Glioblastoma is a fast‐growing type of brain tumour and the MGMT-methylated status can help to predict how some patients might respond to treatment. MGMT-methylated glioblastoma is an aggressive brain cancer that typically results in death within months following diagnosis if not treated. Current therapies remain palliative and include surgery to remove as much of the tumour as possible, followed by chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy.
Nivolumab is a type of immunotherapy that is currently licensed in the UK for the treatment of several types of advanced cancers such as melanoma, non‐small cell lung cancer, and kidney cancer. It blocks a protein called programmed death-1 (PD-1), which is found on the surface of a type of immune cells called T-cells. Blocking PD-1 stimulates the T-cells to kill the cancer cells. Temozolomide in combination with radiotherapy is currently licensed in the UK for newly diagnosed glioblastoma in adults. The addition of nivolumab to temozolomide and radiotherapy will potentially offer an additional first line treatment option for adult patients who are newly diagnosed MGMT-methylated glioblastoma.

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